I met Doug Gordon in the mid-seventies. He was a news reporter on the Sunday Times. It was Doug who suggested that I apply for a job as a columnist on the then great broadsheet.

The Sunday Times in those days was a unique and often bizarre blend of tabloid journalism and serious political analysis. Tertius Myburgh, the editor, called it ”quali-pop”.

Myburgh referred to the “craft” of journalism and how “we” could make our “craft” a socio-political force in South Africa.

It worked. The Sunday Times had a readership of some four million.

It snagged the serious attention of local politicians, international statesmen and some of the best political analysts from South Africa and abroad, all of whom jostled for space in the paper’s opinion pages.

Politically? Myburgh said we were ‘extreme centre.’

To be a journo on the Sunday Times in those days was to have a job with kudos. There were high standards and…

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